More and more, less and less: Italian grammar lesson 138

Summary

Unlock the secrets of expressing degrees in Italian like a pro! 🇮🇹 Dive into our lesson to master the art of saying “more and more” and “less and less” with authentic Italian flair. Get ready to impress with your linguistic finesse!

  • Double Comparatives: Learn the Italian trick for “more and more” with sempre più. Just like stacking pancakes, you’ll stack your verbs, adjectives, or nouns for that extra oomph!
  • Chilly Vibes: When the temperature drops, say it’s getting sempre più freddo (colder and colder). It’s the perfect phrase for those brisk Italian winters or your next ski trip in the Alps!
  • Flip the Script: Less is sometimes more! Use sempre meno to express “less and less” or “fewer and fewer”. It’s like watching your pasta portions shrink (sad, but sometimes necessary).
  • Verb Power: No adjective? No problem! Crank up the intensity with sempre di più or dial it down with sempre di meno. It’s like adjusting the volume on your favorite Italian opera.
  • Real-Life Examples: Get practical with phrases like “It’s raining sempre di più” or “I’m going out sempre di meno“. They’re not just sentences; they’re your new Italian mantras.

My thoughts

How to say more and more in Italian?

In English, these expressions are called double comparatives. To convey the meaning of “more and more” in Italian we use the following construction: verb + sempre più + adjective or adverb or noun.

Have a look at some examples:

Giulia sta diventando sempre più intelligente.

Giulia is getting more and more intelligent.

Questo prodotto viene comprato sempre più spesso.

This product is being bought more and more often.

As you know, if the adjective used is short, in English, you can also decide to add the suffix -er to it, and repeat it twice.

In Italian, the construction will be the same.

Fa sempre più freddo.

It is getting colder and colder.

How to say less and less in Italian?

To translate “less and less” in Italian we use exactly the same construction, but we use the word meno (less) instead of più (more). Easy enough, don’t you think?

The structure is: verb + sempre meno + adjective or adverb or noun.

Let’s see some examples:

Giulio mi sembra sempre meno simpatico.

Giulio seems to me less and less pleasant.

C’è sempre meno povertà in quest’area.

There is less and less poverty in this area.

Sempre meno also translates as fewer and fewer, which is used in English with countable nouns:

C’è sempre meno gente qui.

There are fewer and fewer people here.

What is sempre di meno, sempre di più?

In English, you can also use the expressions “more and more” and “less and less” with a verb that is not followed by any adverb, noun, or adjective.

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What do you do in Italian then? In this case, when we want to talk about something happening more and more, or a quantity being less and less we simply add the preposition di in between the two words:

  • Verb + sempre di più
  • Verb + sempre di meno

Let’s have a look at some examples:

Sta piovendo sempre di più in questi giorni.

It is raining more and more these days.

Questi dispositivi costano sempre di meno.

These devices are cheaper and cheaper (cost less and less).

Sto uscendo sempre di meno in questi mesi.

I am going out less and less these months.

Mi piaci sempre di più.

I like you more and more.

If you loved this lesson, try out our Italian Course to take your Italian to the next level.

How to say more and more in Italian?

You can say more and more by using verb + sempre più + adjective or adverb or noun

How to say less and less in Italian?

You can say less and less by using verb + sempre meno + adjective or adverb or noun

How to say "more and more" or "less and less" with emphasize in Italian?

By adding the preposition "di" in between the two words: Verb + Sempre di più or verb + Sempre di meno.

Italian word of the day
passeggiata
Example
Hai voglia di fare una passeggiata?
Do you feel like going for a walk?
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