How to use “avere bisogno”: Italian grammar lesson 24

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Summary

Master the Italian way to express “need” with our guide! Learn the nuances between “bisognare” and “avere bisogno di” to speak like a native. We’ll dive into usage, examples, and grammar tips to ensure you’re using each perfectly. 🇮🇹✨

  • Impersonal Needs: Use “bisognare” when there’s no specific subject. It’s an impersonal verb that’s great for general rules or universal truths. Remember, it’s always third person singular: “bisogna“.
  • Conjugation: Stick to simple tenses with “bisognare“. It’s a one-trick pony that doesn’t venture into complex tenses, keeping things straightforward and singular.
  • Subject-Specific Needs: When a need involves a specific subject, “avere bisogno di” is your go-to. Conjugate “avere” to fit the mood and tense, and you’re all set to express personal needs.
  • Preposition Particulars: The preposition “di” can change its form based on the noun that follows. Get this right, and you’ll sound like you’ve been chatting in Italian for years!
  • Physical or Abstract: Whether you’re yearning for a tangible item or something more conceptual, “avere bisogno di” has got you covered. It’s versatile and ready for all your needs.
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How to say need in Italian: avere bisogno di and bisognare

The English verb “need” is often translated in Italian with either the impersonal verb bisognare or the verbal expression avere bisogno di: avere + bisogno + di + noun/verb.

Let’s take a closer look at the differences between the two.

avere bisogno di

Bisognare: meaning, when to use and examples

Bisognare is exclusively used as an impersonal verb (meaning that it does not need a grammatical subject).

It exists just in simple tenses (simple future, simple conditional, etc..) and is used only in the third person singular: bisogna.

An infinite verb always follows it when the subject is not identified.

to need in italian

Let’s look at some sentences to see when it’s suitable to use the verb bisognare.

  • To express a need or an obligation for some action to be performed when there is no subject (it refers to a general rule or something that applies to everyone).
    In this case, bisognare is followed by a verb in the infinitive form:

Bisogna fare silenzio al cinema durante il film.

It is necessary to be quiet at the cinema during the movie.

  • To express a need or an obligation for some action to be performed when a subject is determined. In this case, bisognare is followed by che + subjunctive

Bisogna che gli studenti si impegnino di più.

It is necessary that the students work harder.

bisogno italian to english

Avere bisogno di: meaning, when to use and examples

The verbal expression avere bisogno di can be broken down as follows:

The verb avere: it is conjugated as usual according to the mood and tense which fit the sentence

+ the noun bisogno

+ preposition di

+ a noun that indicates the object or person that is needed or a verb in the infinitive form that indicates the action that needs to be performed.

how to say i need in italian

Note on the verb avere: like other frequently used verbs, avere is an irregular verb, meaning that it does not follow the same pattern as other second conjugation verbs and presents many different forms for each tense.

Note on the preposition di: when di is followed by a verb (in the infinitive form), it is always left as is.

For nouns, instead, it might be left as is or conjugated according to the noun immediately following it.

It is left as is if the noun requires no article or if it requires an indefinite article. It is conjugated if the noun requires a definitive article.

In that case, one of the following seven forms is used: del, dello, dei, degli, della, delle, or dell’.

bisogno meaning

Avere bisogno di: Examples

How to use bisogno in Italian?

How to say “I need” in Italian?

Let’s look at some sentences to see when it’s suitable to use the expression avere bisogno di.

  • With a noun, to express the need for something (physical)

Ho bisogno di una macchina nuova.

I need a new car.

  • With a noun, to express the need for something (abstract or metaphorical)

Noi abbiamo bisogno del tuo aiuto.

We need your help.

  • With a verb, to express the need to do something

Ho bisogno di fare una vacanza.

I need to go on a vacation.

  • With the pronouns me/te/lui/lei/noi/voi/loro.

Hai bisogno di me?

Do you need me? (= do you need my help?)

italian verb to need

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Need in Italian: what to remember?

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If you’re looking for how to say “need” in Italian, you have two options: the impersonal verb ‘bisognare’ or the verbal expression ‘avere bisogno di.

When using ‘bisognare‘, it’s exclusively used as an impersonal verb (meaning it doesn’t need a grammatical subject) and only exists in simple tenses (like simple future and simple conditional).

It’s always used in the third person singular: ‘bisogna’, and it’s usually used to express a need or an obligation for some action to be performed.

The expression ‘avere bisogno di’ is broken down into the verb ‘avere’, the noun ‘bisogno’, and the preposition ‘di’.

The verb ‘avere’ is conjugated according to the mood and tense of the sentence, and the preposition ‘di’ can be left as is or conjugated depending on the noun that follows it.

This expression is used to express the need for something physical, the need for something abstract or metaphorical, or the need to do something.

We hope this helps you better understand the difference between these two ways of saying “need” in Italian!

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FAQs on How to use “avere bisogno”: Italian grammar lesson 24

What is the Italian verb to need?

The verb bisognare has become obsolete except in its third person form, bisogno. It is used in combination with avere and di to form the phrase 'avere bisogno di…', which means 'to have a need for…'.

How do you use Bisogna?

Bisogna is an efficient and impartial way to discuss what needs to be done. An example of using Bisogna in a conversation between two housemates might be: Bisogna acquistare il caffè!

What is the difference between serve and bisogno?

“Mi serve” is an Italian phrase which translates to “I need”. This phrase uses the verb servire (to need) to express a requirement for something which will enable someone to reach a goal or finish a task, instead of just a physical necessity like avere bisogno di.

Italian word of the day
lunga
Example
È una giornata lunga.
It’s a long day.
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3 Responses

    1. Hi Ann R,

      I’m glad to hear you found the lesson on how to express “need” in Italian useful. It’s always great to see students like you making progress and finding value in our content. If you have any more questions or need further clarification on any aspect of the Italian language or culture, don’t hesitate to ask. We’re here to help!

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