Making comparisons

How to compare one person or thing with another? To make the comparative form we should place the adverbs più (for a comparative of majority) or meno (for a comparative of minority) before the adjective.

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“The most” and “the least”: Italian grammar lesson 135

“The most” and “the least”: Italian grammar lesson 135

Get ready to master the art of expressing extremes in Italian! This guide will teach you how to use the superlativo relativo to highlight the best and worst, making your Italian as sharp as a Michelin chef’s knife! 🇮🇹✨

  • Definite Article + “più”: Combine a definite article with “più” (most) and an adjective to describe the highest degree of quality, followed by “di” or “tra” for comparison.
  • Definite Article + “meno”: Use a definite article with “meno” (least) plus an adjective to express the lowest degree, again using “di” or “tra” to compare.
  • Choosing “di” or “tra”: Pick “di” for “of” and “tra” (or “fra”) for “among” when setting up your comparison stage. It’s like choosing the right spice for your pasta! 🍝
  • Irregular Forms: Some adjectives break the mold with unique forms. Remember, “buono” becomes “migliore”, and “cattivo” turns into “peggiore”—they’re the VIPs of the adjective world!
  • Omitting “di” or “tra”: When it’s clear who or what you’re comparing, feel free to drop “di” or “tra”. It’s like leaving off that extra slice of cheese when the pizza’s already perfect. 🍕
How to make comparisons II: Italian grammar lesson 134

How to make comparisons II: Italian grammar lesson 134

Get ready to level up your Italian with our guide on mastering comparatives! Learn the ins and outs of using più and meno to compare everything from adjectives to verbs, and even nouns. 🇮🇹✨

  • Adjective Showdown: When you’re pitting two adjectives against each other, stick with più + adjective + che. It’s like saying someone is “more sweet than sour” in Italian style. 🍬 > 🍋
  • Preposition Play: Got a preposition in your comparison? Use più or meno to jazz up your sentence. It’s like choosing between a movie or a concert – both rock, but one just più! 🎥🎤
  • Verb Vibe: Comparing actions? Throw in più before your verb to spice things up. It’s the difference between a marathon and a sprint in the language race. 🏃💨
  • Noun Nuance: When nouns are in the ring, più + noun + che is your go-to combo. It’s like saying pizza is more life than food – deep, right? 🍕❤️
  • Adverb Action: Even adverbs can get in on the comparative fun with più and meno. It’s all about tweaking the intensity of your actions. Go big or go home! 🚀
How to say “as far as possible”: Italian grammar lesson 137

How to say “as far as possible”: Italian grammar lesson 137

Unlock the secrets of expressing possibilities in Italian like a native! Learn the nifty trick of using “il più possibile” and its counterpart “il meno possibile” to convey ‘as much as possible’ and ‘as little as possible’ with flair.

  • Grasp the Basics:Il più possibile” translates to ‘as … as possible’. It’s your go-to phrase for stretching the limits in Italian conversations. 🚀
  • Adverb Magic: Sandwich an adverb between “il più” and “possibile” to amplify your actions. Think “il più rapidamente possibile” for ‘as quickly as possible’. Speedy speech, here we come! ⚡
  • Flip the Script: Swap “più” for “meno” to play it down. “Il meno possibile” is your low-key, ‘as little as possible’ phrase. Keep it cool and minimal. 😎
  • Adjective Acrobatics: Adjectives aren’t left out! Use them with “il più” or “il meno” for a descriptive punch. “Il più elegante possibile” means ‘as elegant as possible’. Dress your words to impress! 👗
  • Noun Know-how: Count on nouns to quantify. Drop “il” and go plural or singular depending on the noun’s countability. “Più libri possibile” equals ‘as many books as possible’. Stack those word shelves! 📚
Bellissimo – The superlative: Italian grammar lesson 136

Bellissimo – The superlative: Italian grammar lesson 136

Get ready to amp up your Italian with the ultimate guide to the superlativo assoluto! Learn to express the highest degree of quality, from “extremely” to “super,” and even tackle those tricky irregular forms with ease.

  • Transform adjectives into their most intense form by dropping the last letter and adding –ISSIMO/A/I/E. For example, bello becomes bellissimo. It’s that simple! 😎
  • Boost your adjectives with adverbs like molto (very) or davvero (really) for a less formal but equally powerful punch. Estremamente lucky, anyone?
  • Go casual and cool by slapping a prefix like super- or iper- onto your adjectives. Talk about a strabello movie or being arcistufa of complaints!
  • Remember, some adjectives have an irregular superlativo assoluto, like buono to ottimo. Keep these special forms in your back pocket for when you need to impress.
  • Watch out for the no-go zone with adjectives that don’t play nice with comparison or intensity. Geographical names, altered adjectives, or those that are already extreme are off-limits for superlatives.
How to make comparisons: Italian grammar lesson 133

How to make comparisons: Italian grammar lesson 133

Unlock the secrets of Italian comparisons with our guide! Learn to express “more than” and “less than” with ease, and master the nuances of più di and meno di to compare everything from nouns to adverbs. 🇮🇹✨

  • Comparative Basics: Use più for “more” and meno for “less” when comparing two things. Remember, it’s all about the adjective sandwiched between these words and the thing you’re comparing. 🥪
  • Noun Comparisons: When the second part of your comparison is a noun, like comparing Giulio to Greta, stick with di after your adjective. It’s like saying “less pleasant than” in Italian style. 🧍‍♂️🧍‍♀️
  • Pronoun Showdown: Even when you’re comparing to a pronoun, più di and meno di are your go-to phrases. It’s the Italian way to say “we are older than you” without breaking a sweat. 👥
  • Adverb Comparisons: Got an adverb in your comparison? No problemo! Use più di to say the weather is “better than before” and sound like a local. ☀️➡️🌧️
  • Preposizione Articolata: When an article enters the ring, di bulks up into a preposizione articolata. Match it with the noun’s number and gender to say “younger than Ms. Anna” like a pro. 💪
  • Verb Comparisons: If you’re comparing actions without a specific term, just add di before più. It’s the secret ingredient to say “costs more” and win the Italian grammar game. 🏆
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