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Learn Italian phrases

Italian phrases

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In this post, you’re going to learn how to count in Italian.

You’ll also learn how to talk about the days of the week, months, seasons, and your family.

Finally, you’ll learn some common Italian phrases and Italian for travel.

The numbers in Italian

When you start learning a new language, one of the first things you learn is numbers.

The numbers in Italian are not hard to remember, and everything follows a very logical pattern.

If you manage to learn how to count from one to ten, you will have an easy time learning further.

Here are the numbers from 0 to 10:

0 – Zero
1 – Uno
2 – Due
3 – Tre
4 – Quattro
5 – Cinque
6- Sei
7 – Sette
8 – Otto
9 – Nove
10 – Dieci

After ten, things start to get interesting.

From eleven to sixteen, numbers end in dici.

Starting with seventeen, just say dici in front of the single-digit number.

11 – Undici
12 – Dodici
13 – Tredici
14 – Quattordici
15 – Quindici
16 – Sedici
17 – Diciasette
18 – Diciotto
19 – Diciannove
20 – Venti

The numbers in Italian

After twenty, it gets easier. You only need to remember how say the tens, and pair them together.

21 – Ventuno
22 – Ventidue
23 – Ventitre
24 – Ventiquattro
25 – Venticinque
26 – Ventisei
27 – Ventisette
28 – Ventotto
29 – Ventinove
30 – Trenta

And the same rule stands for thirty:

31 – Trentuno
32 – Trentadue
33 – Trentatre
34 – Trentaquattro
35 – Trentacinque
36 – Trentasei
37 – Trentasette
38 – Trentotto
39 – Trentanove
40 – Quaranta

If you pay attention to the pattern, starting with forty, all the tens will end in anta, so it’s going to be very easy to remember: quaranta (forty), cinquanta (fifty), sessanta (sixty), settanta (seventy), ottanta (eighty), novanta (ninety).

And cento (one hundred)!

Here’s a video with numbers in Italian:

 

Learn more about the numbers in Italian.

Days of the week in Italian

If you’ve started learning Italian, whether for pleasure or to improve your professional profile, it won’t be long before you need to learn the days of the week in Italian.

Here they are:

lunedì

Monday

martedì

Tuesday

mercoledì

Wednesday

giovedì

Thursday

venerdì

Friday

sabato

Saturday

domenica

Sunday

Did you notice? The first five days of the week (lunedì, martedì, mercoledì, giovedì, venerdì) end with , where the stress of the word falls.

This is an old way of saying giorno (day), the equivalent of Mon-day, Tues-day etc.

the days of the week Italian

Learn more about the days of the week in Italian.

Months and seasons in Italian

If you are an English speaker, you are in luck, as the names for the months in Italian and English come from the same Latin root, which makes them sound similar in the two languages.

mese/ mesi

month/ months

gennaio

January

febbraio

February

marzo

March

aprile

April

maggio

May

giugno

June

luglio

July

agosto

August

settembre

September

ottobre

October

novembre

November

dicembre

December

Well, if you’ve learned the name of the months in Italian, you might as well learn the seasons!

le stagioni

the seasons

primavera

spring

estate

summer

autunno

autumn / fall

inverno

winter

the months of the year Italian

Read more about the months of the year in Italian.

Your Family in Italian

If you’ve watched enough gangster movies, you probably know the Italian word for family: la famiglia.

In Italy, family is sacred: it is an essential aspect of the culture and of every Italian’s life, so knowing all the terms to talk about your family is key if you want to sound like a native speaker.

Let’s start with those creatures who put us into this world…

genitori

parents

Careful here, as there is a word in Italian that is dangerously similar to “parents”: parenti. This, however, means “relatives”, and not “parents”!

madre/ mamma/ mammina

mother/ mom/ mommy

padre/papà/ babbo

father/ dad/ daddy

marito

husband

moglie

wife

figlio

son

figlia

daughter

fratello

brother

sorella

sister

nonno

grandfather

nonna

grandmother

How to talk about the family in Italian

Learn more about how to talk about your family in Italian.

Common Italian Phrases

Language learning is a challenging activity for your brain.

In fact, learning a language is a perfect way to boost your IQ.

In no time, your brain will make new connections and associations and you’ll feel that learning the Italian language was one of the best choices you ever made.

So, let’s learn some common Italian phrases:

Ciao

Hello/ goodbye (informal)

Salve

Hello (formal)

Buongiorno

Good morning/afternoon

Buonasera

Good evening

Buonanotte

Goodnight

Grazie mille

Thank you very much

Arrivederci

Goodbye (formal)

Mi chiamo…

My name is…

Sono americano/canadese/inglese

I’m American/Canadian/English

Piacere

Nice to meet you

Yes

No

No

Per favore/ per piacere/ per cortesia

Please

Grazie

Thank you

Molte grazie

Thank you very much.

Prego!

You’re welcome!

Mi scusi

Excuse me (formal)

Prego

By all means

Può ripetere, per cortesia?

Can you please repeat? (formal)

Mi scusi, non capisco

Sorry, I don’t understand! (formal)

Non parlo italiano molto bene.

I don’t speak Italian very well.

Cosa vuole dire?

What does that mean?

Parla inglese?

Do you speak English? (formal)

Mi scusi

I’m sorry (formal)

Non lo so

I don’t know

Va bene

All right

Non importa

Never mind

Italian for travel 1

Learn more Italian phrases.

Italian For Travel

If you’re planning to take a trip to Italy, you will definitely need to start learning a few of the most common phrases.

Even though there are a lot of Italian words and phrases, there’s no need to feel overwhelmed.

If you learn as little as 100 words, you will be able to understand a big part of any Italian text.

Che ore sono?

What time is it?

Dov’è il bagno?

Where is the bathroom/ toilet?

Vorrei andare a…

I want to go to…

A che ora parte il prossimo treno/autobus per…?

What time is the next train/bus to…?

Quanto costa?

How much is it?

Un biglietto/ due biglietti

One ticket/ two tickets

Gira a destra

Turn right (informal)

Gira a sinistra

Turn left (informal)

È qua vicino

It’s close by

È davanti alla scuola

It’s opposite the school

È dietro la stazione

It’s behind the station

È dopo la gelateria

It’s past the ice-cream parlor

Un tavolo per uno / due, per favore

A table for one / two, please

Mi scusi!

Excuse me! (Calling a waiter)

Cosa mi consiglia?

What do you recommend?

Qual è la specialità della casa?

What’s your most popular dish?

Cos’è questo?

What’s this?

Il conto, per favore

The check, please

Mi potrebbe dare menu, per favore?

Can I have the menu, please?

Quando parte?

When does it leave?

Useful Italian phrases 1

Learn more about Italian vocabulary for travel.

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