Credere di: Italian grammar lesson 190

stefano lodola italian teacher
Stefano
Italian language tutor, course author. MEng, MBA. Member of the International Association of Hyperpolyglots (HYPIA). After learning 12 languages, I can tell you that we all master languages by listening and mimicking. I couldn’t find an app to recommend to my students, so I made my own one. With my method, you’ll be speaking Italian from Lesson 1.
What is active recall? In the last years, there has been so much hype around active recall as it is believed to improve your study results and get you better...
Activities to improve communication skills in a foreign language shift the focus of teaching from the language itself to actually doing things in that language.
How to practice speaking alone? For best results, turn virtually any study time (reading, listening, writing) into speaking practice for language immersion!
Italian for beginners can be a pain to learn. Not with this polyglot's video guide with 8 solutions to get started! The best way to survive and avoid pitfalls.
Struggling with listening? An Italian polyglot has valuable advice about comprehensible input. A quick guide to master any language fast. From pain to joy!
How long does it take to learn Italian? Is it hard? How fast you improve depends on your study method. Learn why in this honest guide by an Italian polyglot!
Struggling with new words? An Italian polyglot has valuable advice about spaced repetition. A quick guide to memorize vocabulary fast, from pain to joy!
Language learning is an artificial exercise that occupies time, money, and effort that could be better spent doing language acquisition. Learn to communicate!
What makes a good method of learning a language? To me, a study method is good if it delivers results. Typically, people want to learn Italian to communicate. Thus, progress...

Summary

Dive into the nuances of Italian with our breakdown of “credere di”! Master when to use this phrase over “credere che” and seamlessly blend verbs in the infinitive for that authentic Italian flair. 🇮🇹✨

  • Understanding “credere di”: Get the hang of using credere di when you’re continuing the action with another verb in the infinitive. It’s like saying “I believe I can…” in English. 🤔
  • Same Subject Simplicity: Use credere di when the subject of both actions is the same. No need to repeat yourself; Italians get it! 🙋‍♂️🙋‍♀️
  • Infinitive Flexibility: Whether it’s present or past, credere di plays well with both. Choose mangiare or aver mangiato depending on your timeline. ⏳
  • Switching Subjects: If you’re changing the subject mid-sentence, switch to credere che. Keep things clear when the doer of the action changes. 👥
  • Practical Examples: Absorb the concept with real-life examples. From thinking you’re funny to believing you’ve made the right choice, see how Italians express it. 😄👍
stefano lodola cover
Play Video about stefano lodola cover

What is the meaning of credere di in Italian?

In today’s post, we’re going to focus on when we say credere di. And, just so you know, the same rules apply for pensare di.

Have a look at the following example:

Noi non crediamo di potere andare in vacanza.

We don’t think we can go on holiday.

As you can see, in English we didn’t translate non crediamo di as “don’t think of” but just as didn’t think, since otherwise it would just sound odd.

When to use credere di

When do we say credere di?

You might be wondering why, then, we use credere di instead of just credere or credere che.

Basically, we use credere di when we want to carry on talking about another action and, thus, we use another verb in the infinitive (its base form, like potere).

Also, we use credere di when the subject in the first clause is the same as the subject in the second clause, as you can see below:

(1) Noi non crediamo di (2) potere andare in vacanza.

(1) We don’t think (2) we can go on holiday.

The subject is noi (we) in both clauses: the people who “don’t think” are the same who cannot “go on holiday”.

However, in Italian we don’t need to add a subject in the second clause (right after di) because, for us, it’s obvious it’s the same as the one in the first clause.

Here’s the structure: Subject +credere or pensare conjugated +di + verb in the infinitive.

By the way, after di we can use the present infinitive (mangiare) or the past infinitive (aver mangiato), depending on whether we’re referring to the present or the past.

When to use credere di in Italian

When do we say credere che?

We wouldn’t use credere di if the subject in the first clause was different to the subject in the second clause, like in the sentence below:

(1) Noi non crediamo che (2) loro possano andare in vacanza.

(1) We don’t think (2) they can go on holiday.

In this case, the subject is noi (we) in the first clause and loro (they) in the second clause, so we cannot use credere di. We use credere che instead.

Free Guide
How to Learn Languages Fast

But don’t worry about credere che for now.

Just make sure you understand when we use credere di.

Credere di when to use

Credi di: examples

Let’s now have a look at some more examples:

Credi di essere divertente?

Do you think you’re funny?

Credo di volere venire anche io.

I think I want to come too.

Cosa credete di fare?

What do you think you’re doing?

Credo di aver capito.

I think I understood.

Non credono di aver fatto nulla di grave.

They don’t think they did anything serious.

Lei crede di aver fatto la cosa giusta.

She thinks she did the right thing.

Non credo di mangiare tanto.

I don’t think I’m eating too much.

Credere di when to use in Italian

Learn in the car with Think in Italian
Play Video about Learn in the car with Think in Italian

FAQs on Credere di: Italian grammar lesson 190

What is the meaning of "credere"?

It literally means to believe but in Italian is used with the sense of to think.

When do we use "credere di"?

When we want to carry on talking about another action and when the subject in the first clause is the same as the subject in the second clause.

How's the structure of "credere di"?

Subject +  credere or pensare conjugations + di + past or present infinitive. Note that in Italian adding a subject in the second clause is not necessary because it's implicit.

When do we use "credere che"?

When the subject in the first clause is different to the subject in the second clause.

Italian word of the day
cappuccino
Example
Vorrei un cappuccino, per favore.
I’d like a cappuccino, please.
Follow me to fluency​

Receive my free resources once a week together with my best offers! 

Create a free lifetime account to get access to all the free lesson and other resources.

Leave a Reply

Share:

Take a free lesson today!

Create a free lifetime account to get access to all the free lessons and other resources.

I’ll also deliver my free resources my best offers to your mailbox (opt out at any time).

Read more about Italian grammar lessons
Understanding the Verb “Fare” The Italian language is known for its rich and versatile verbs, and one such verb is “fare.” The verb “fare” encompasses various meanings such as “to...
What pure means in Italian? Pure is a very common word among Italian speakers. It’s also a very interesting one because, like many other Italian words, it has different meanings...
How to use non so se in Italian? If you’re wondering what non so se means in Italian and how to structure it, you’re in the right place. In English, non...
What is the conjugation of potere, volere, and dovere? As we saw in a previous lesson about the irregular future tense, we use the future tense to talk about something that will...
Try my courses for free​
Stefano

Log in

Reset password or get in touch.

Not a member yet? Join today!

How long to fluency?

Find out how long it will take you to master Italian!
Get on the right track in 3 minutes.

dolce vita logo

We're already friends!

Coming from Luca and Marina?
Here's a special deal for you!
Just tell me where I should send the coupon.

50% OFF
all language resources

We're already friends!

Coming from All Language Resources?
Here's a special deal for you!
Just tell me where I should send the coupon.

50% OFF
GRAB A COUPON NOW, REDEEM IT LATER
50% OFF

To receive free resources once a week together with my best offers, just tell me where to send everything. Opt out at any time.

Create a free lifetime account to get access to all the free lesson and other resources.